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Kid Licks: The World’s First Edible, Organic Nail Polish

Husband and wife team, Audrey Amara and Josh Kroot, have come up with the idea for a nail polish that is safe enough that kids can apply themselves, with inspiration from their independent daughter who wanted to start painting her nails by herself.

Today, with three kids and one on the way, Audrey and Josh are selling Kid Licks online in three colors. In a little over a year, after their kids went to bed, they managed to create a nail polish that is edible, organic and dries as fast as regular nail polish. Most importantly, they trust their children to take Kid Licks into a corner and paint their own nails without any supervision.

Since regular nail polish, including nail polish “for kids” made with things like, Acrylates polymer and artificial pigment, is something that Audrey and Josh would not want anywhere near their daughter’s mouth, because everything ends up there, they thought it would be awesome if they could develop something that was edible and organic.

So, after long hours experimenting in the kitchen, they came up with a recipe for Kid Licks made just from organic fruits, veggies and plants. It dries smooth and shiny in about the same time as conventional nail polish, but with a beautiful, natural, veggie based color. Kid Licks can be scrubbed off with water, which makes it convenient for children to remove all by themselves.

Kid Licks is a dream come true for people like, Kimberly Bezenek, a mother of three, who keeps a list of things her kids have eaten that shouldn’t have gone in their mouths. “Fyi- California Baby Sunscreen is safe to ingest according to poison control. Add that to my list,” Bezenek wrote on her Facebook page.

In fact, Audrey and Josh think it is uncommon for a child to get through the younger years without giving their parents some kind of similar scare. Having kid safe products around that do not carry the danger of being hazardous if ingested is a way to face the problem head on. “Let’s make it fun for kids to put on their own nail polish,” Audrey said.

Kid Licks is a perfect addition to party bags, in fact many people have asked Audrey and Josh whether they’ll do private events because they enjoyed getting their Kid Licks mini manicures at various events around the Los Angeles area. Audrey is excited about how many people “it is definitely something we’re thinking about doing. Right now we’re just focusing on spreading the word and getting Kid Licks in stores and farmers markets.”

Audrey said they want to use their product to promote healthier beauty practices and give kids a way to use nail polish without adult supervision. They have received lots of positive feedback and support from parents looking for a healthier nail polish, especially for children.

Right now Kid Licks is being sold in small batches through the Kid Licks website, kidlicks.com/ and at events around the Los Angeles area. The demand has been so strong that Audrey is laying the groundwork to get it manufactured in larger quantities.

With Girl Scouts She Will……

  • Discover a world full of fun experiences and new activities
  • Boost her confidence and help her make a whole bunch of new friends
  • Find a safe place to explore her interests and learn new skills

With us, she can go as far as her imagination will take her (and you can be there, right by her side).
As a Girl Scout volunteer, you’ll not only be the role model that gets to show her something new, you get to share those memorable moments just waiting for you and the girl in your life.
Need to know more? Check out what caregivers and volunteers have to say:

  • 95% of caregivers say she’s made more friends through Girl Scouts
  • 89% of caregivers say their daughter is happier because of Girl Scouts
  • 90% of caregivers say their girl has grown more confident through Girl Scouts
  • 95% of volunteers say they make girls lives better at Girl Scouts
  • 88% of Girl Scout volunteers say their volunteer experience with us makes their life better
  • Two thirds of volunteers say Girl Scouts has helped them professionally

Nevada PEP

June Training

Say Goodbye to Your Child’s Challenging Behavior
Tuesday, June 2
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

IEP Clinic Workshop
Tuesday, June 9
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Diga Adiós a los Comportamientos Desafiantes de su Hijo
Martes, 16 de Junio
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Bullies, Targets, and Bystanders: Responses that Work
Wednesday, June 17
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Getting that First Job
Thursday, June 18
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Ayude a su Hijo a Concentrarse en el Aprendizaje
Miercoles, 24 de Junio
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Help Support Your Child to Focus on Learning
Thursday, June 25
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

June Webinars

Bullies, Targets, and Bystanders: Responses that Work
Tuesday, June 2
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Making the Most Out of Your Baby’s Early Intervention Services
Thursday, June 11
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Considering College? Learn What’s Available and How to Get It
Wednesday, June 24
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

How Can I Protect My Children from the Sun?

Just a few serious sunburns can increase your child’s risk of skin cancer later in life. Kids don’t have to be at the pool, beach, or on vacation to get too much sun. Their skin needs protection from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays whenever they’re outdoors.

Seek shade.

UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday, so it’s best to plan indoor activities then. If this is not possible, seek shade under a tree, an umbrella, or a pop-up tent. Use these options to prevent sunburn, not to seek relief after it’s happened.

Cover up.

When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

Get a hat.

Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids, but they don’t protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.

Wear sunglasses.

They protect your child’s eyes from UV rays, which can lead to cataracts later in life. Look for sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.

Apply sunscreen.

Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and UVA and UVB protection every time your child goes outside. For the best protection, apply sunscreen generously 30 minutes before going outdoors. Don’t forget to protect ears, noses, lips, and the tops of feet.

Take sunscreen with you to reapply during the day, especially after your child swims or exercises. This applies to waterproof and water-resistant products as well.

Follow the directions on the package for using a sunscreen product on babies less than 6 months old. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your or your child’s skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor. Your baby’s best defense against sunburn is avoiding the sun or staying in the shade.

Keep in mind, sunscreen is not meant to allow kids to spend more time in the sun than they would otherwise. Try combining sunscreen with other options to prevent UV damage.

Too Much Sun Hurts

Turning pink? Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun’s UV rays in as little as 15 minutes. Yet it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. So, if your child’s skin looks “a little pink” today, it may be burned tomorrow morning. To prevent further burning, get your child out of the sun.

Tan? There’s no other way to say it—tanned skin is damaged skin. Any change in the color of your child’s skin after time outside—whether sunburn or suntan—indicates damage from UV rays.

Cool and cloudy? Children still need protection. UV rays, not the temperature, do the damage. Clouds do not block UV rays, they filter them—and sometimes only slightly.

Oops! Kids often get sunburned when they are outdoors unprotected for longer than expected. Remember to plan ahead, and keep sun protection handy—in your car, bag, or child’s backpack.

No Matter How You Spell It, Ice Cream is the best therapy!

For most kids (young and old), ice cream has been used to celebrate, to decompress, to remember and relive happy times. A year ago, we opened Eis Cream Cafe. Our happy place!

Small batched, gourmet ice cream converge with a friendly, inviting neighborhood atmosphere. 400 pounds of fresh dairy are delivered every day to the creamery in Northern California and made into one flavor at a time. Only the ripest cherries, strawberries, black raspberries, watermelon and peaches are utilized in our seasonal offerings. Pan roasted pistachios and almonds are generously sprinkled throughout. Guittard chocolate and bold coffee create unforgettable flavor pops. Taro, macapuno (young coconut) and mangos (Cebu) are flown in from the Philippines.

Just as there is a lot of love and pride placed in our products, we are happy and honored to serve the good people of Las Vegas as well. Our vision is to make a lasting positive imprint in the community. An elderly couple, who found each other later in life, had their reception here. When a 3rd grader learned his father took on a new job in another state, his classmates had an impromtu after-school going away party. Last week, we hosted a soccer trophy ceremony for 4 year old girls team. We love hosting birthday parties, mommy groups and play dates. What a wonderful blessing this journey has been! Being a part of these moments are the best!

EIS CREAM + a strong sense of COMMUNITY = the BEST THERAPY EVER

Eis Cream Cafe ( corner of Silverado Ranch and Eastern in the Target Plaza), 9711 South Eastern Ave, Suite H-1, Las Vegas, NV 89183, 702-270-2191. Summer Hours: Monday – Sunday Noon – 10 p.m. www.eiscreamcafe.com

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